(OpenAccessGovernment) UK Research and Innovation (UKRI) is investing £31 million into seven projects to show how quantum technologies could solve some of the greatest mysteries of the universe such as dark matter and black holes.
A project led by the University of Nottingham aims to provide insights to the physics of the early universe and black holes that cannot be tested in a laboratory.
The team will use quantum simulators to simulate the conditions of the early universe and black holes with sufficient accuracy to confirm some of Einstein’s predictions on general relativity.
A team led by Royal Holloway, University of London, will develop new quantum sensors which can be used to search for dark matter.
The projects are supported through the Quantum Technologies for Fundamental Physics programme, delivered by the Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) as part of UKRI’s Strategic Priorities Fund. The programme is part of the National Quantum Technologies Programme.

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