(SpectrumIEEE) Industry and academia are joining forces to establish a work force that meet the demands of a burgeoning field of quantum computing.
Education leaders from IBM, NYU and Howard University recently met virtually to discuss the challenges of the anticipated quantum computing talent shortage.
“You have to have advanced education in order to make a good living in this industry,” explained Tina Brower-Thomas, Education Director and Howard University Executive Director, Center for Integrated Quantum Materials. “So the question is are we preparing our K through 12 to go to the schools.”
IBM has been trying to pull both industry and academia together to prepare for the day when quantum computing requires a large number of trained professionals. One of IBM’s initiatives has been its Qiskit Global Summer School for future quantum software developers.
Abe Asfaw, Global Lead of Quantum Education, IBM Quantum, noted that what’s really helped has been the advent of cloud-based quantum computing.
Javad Shabani, Assistant Professor of Physics and Chair of the Shabani Lab, New York University, believes that if we’re looking for a generation that are really going to make breakthroughs, they’re going have to learn the hardware of quantum computers.
The experiences of Shabani, Asfaw and Brower-Thomas all confirmed that even if you engage people early, broaden the spectrum of people who come into the field, a key issue is being able to offer students realistic and practical expectations of what they can expect in the immediate future for the themselves.

0