By IQT News posted 10 Dec 2019

(Phys.org) Researchers at the University of British Columbia have been able to record, frame-by-frame, how an electron interacts with certain atomic vibrations in a solid. Controlling these interactions is important for the technological exploitation of quantum materials, including superconductors, which are used in MRI machines, high-speed magnetic levitation trains, and could one day revolutionize how energy is transported.
The research team at UBC’s Stewart Blusson Quantum Matter Institute (SBQMI) developed a new extreme-ultraviolet laser source to enable a technique called time-resolved photoemission spectroscopy for visualizing electron scattering processes at ultrafast timescales.
“Thanks to recent advances in pulsed-laser sources, we’re only just beginning to visualize the dynamic properties of quantum materials,” said Jones, a professor with UBC’s SBQMI and department of Physics and Astronomy.

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