By IQT News posted 21 Aug 2019

(MirageNews) Researchers at the University of Toronto’s Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering are designing portable, lightweight sensors that could access light coded in the form of quantum data. This information, enabling them to cut through the noise and “see” things that are currently invisible.
One benefit of accessing quantum information encoded in light is the ability to cut through “turbid media,” such as fog or scattered light. In these conditions, traditional sensors become overwhelmed. By contrast, quantum sensors could focus in on only the most relevant forms of information, tuning out the ambient “noise.”
“Quantum imaging modalities are no longer a physics experiment,” says Amr Helmy, a professor in the department of electrical and computer engineering. “This is something you could one day hold in your hand.”
Current light sensors, such as those found in smartphones, can detect the wavelengths or colors of the light that hits them, as well as its intensity. When two or more sensors are combined, software can be used to determine the direction from which the light came, in much the same way that our two eyes enable us to perceive distance.

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