Opportunities for Cloud Access to Quantum Computers: 2021-2025

Report IQT-CAQC-0221
Published February 3, 2021

The majority of quantum computer users currently access the quantum computer through a cloud. This has already created a number of opportunities for players in the market. For cloud providers themselves quantum computers present a new market to attack with specially designed and branded offerings. For quantum computer firms themselves the presence of clouds as an access option means that there is a mature pathway to customers and the opportunity to do deals with cloud providers that is profitable for all parties.

The revenue from cloud access will increase as the quantum computing business grows in the next few years. However, there are important factors that will shape the opportunity for quantum clouds going forward. For one thing, there is already signs that prices of quantum computers will begin to drop in the next few years to become more affordable to at least large end users: customer premises computers do not need cloud access. Then there is the question of how today’s classical cloud access will merge into a qubit-transporting quantum Internet.

In this report, we examine the scenarios for evolution of quantum clouds including what users have to expect from them in terms of speeds and latency. We also analyze in some depth how we expect quantum clouds to be branded. The report also includes detailed forecasts of cloud access revenues with breakouts by end user and type of cloud provider. Finally, this report discusses access strategies for the leading quantum computer makers and the direction in which they are headed.

Provisional Table of Contents
Chapter One: Introduction
1.1 Background to this Report: Evolution of the Quantum Cloud Business
1.1.1 Quantum Cloud Suppliers: Cloud Companies vs. Quantum Computer Firms
1.1.2 Will Cloud Access Give Way to Quantum Computers on Customer Premises?
1.1.3 Quantum Clouds and the Coming Quantum Internet
1.1.4 Integration of Quantum Clouds and Classical Clouds
1.2 Goals and Scope of this Report
1.3 Methodology of this Report
1.3.1 Forecast methodology
1.4 Plan of this Report
 
Chapter Two: Quantum Clouds:  Technologies and Products
2.1 End-user and Supplier Expectations for Quantum Clouds
2.1.1 Access Speed Evolution
2.1.2 Latency Considerations
2.1.3 Security Issues in Quantum Clouds
2.2 Pricing Strategies for Quantum Clouds
2.2.1 Time Used Pricing Strategies
2.2.2  Per Operation Pricing Strategies
2.3 Relationship to Other Networks and Value Propositions
2.3.1 Classical Clouds
2.3.2 The Coming Quantum Internet
2.3.3 Clouds vs. Premises Computers
2.4 Branding of Quantum Clouds
2.5 Key Points Made in this Chapter
 
Chapter Three: Markets and Forecasts for Quantum Cloud Computing
3.1 Customer Qualification
3.2 Financial Services Industry: Seven-year Forecasts
3.2.1 Summary of Quantum Computing Applications in Financial Services Industry
3.2.2 Forecast by Type of Cloud Provider
3.2.3 Forecast by Type of Pricing Scheme
3.3 Pharmaceutical and Chemicals Industry: Seven-year Forecasts
3.3.1 Summary of Quantum Computing Applications in Chemicals and Pharma Industry
3.3.2 Forecast by Type of Cloud Provider
3.3.3 Forecast by Type of Pricing Scheme
3.4. Transportation and Logistics:  Seven-year Forecasts
3.4.1 Summary of Quantum Computing Applications in the Transportation and Logistics Industry
3.4.2 Forecast by Type of Cloud Provider
3.4.3 Forecast by Type of Pricing Scheme
3.5 Manufacturing and General Business Applications: Seven-year Forecasts
3.5.1 Summary of Quantum Computing Applications in Manufacturing and General Business
3.5.2 Forecast by Type of Cloud Provider
3.5.3 Forecast by Type of Pricing Scheme
3.6 R&D: Seven-year Forecasts
3.6.1 Summary of Quantum Computing Applications in R&D
3.6.2 Forecast by Type of Cloud Provider
3.6.3 Forecast by Type of Pricing Scheme
3.7 Government and the Military: Seven-year Forecasts
3.7.1 Summary of Quantum Computing Applications in Government and the Military
3.7.2 Forecast by Type of Cloud Provider
3.7.3 Forecast by Type of Cloud Provider
3.8 Other Business Opportunities
3.9 Key Points Made in this Chapter
 
Chapter Four: Quantum Cloud Suppliers and their Partners
4.1 Quantum Cloud Supplier Strategies
4.1.1 Direct Supply by Quantum Computer Makers
4.1.2 Resale of Classical Cloud Services and Branding by Quantum Computer Makers
4.1.3 Role for Traditional Carriers in Cloud Services Provisioning
4.1.4 Transition to the Quantum Internet
4.1.5 Forecast
4.2 Quantum Computer Makers:  Quantum Cloud Strategies
4.2.1 Amazon
4.2.2 Microsoft
4.2.3 IBM
4.2.4 Xanadu
4.2.5 Rigetti
4.2.6 QuTech
4.2.7 QC Ware
4.2.8 IonQ
4.2.9 D-Wave
4.2.10 Honeywell


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