(NewElectronics) Richard Murray, Teledyne e2v’s Business Development Manager for quantum technologies, recently explained the work the company is doing in quantum technology, “While the physics for this has been around for some time, we are only now really beginning to take the research into industrial sensors. We are looking to bridge the gap between the fundamental research being undertaken at universities and working with the supply chain to develop the necessary manufacturing techniques to ensure quantum technology is suitable for use in space.”
“New developments in quantum technology have resulted in the ability to cool atoms close to absolute zero by using lasers. By looking at atomic energy levels any quantum interference effect can be measured.
“We are working to miniaturise the technology so that the sensitivity and accuracy can be deployed more widely in inexpensive space vehicles and rather than being deployed in once-in-a-life time missions, this will allow us to launch cheaper space vehicles capable of providing continuous measurement.”
The ability to measure gravity, by deploying quantum gravity sensors, will enable satellites to finely monitor the movement of mass within the Earth.
NOTE to IQT readers: This is a wide-ranging article on the current stage of space technology.

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