(Science.mag) The success of quantum computing relies on the ability to entangle large-scale systems. Various platforms are being pursued, with architectures based on superconducting qubits and trapped atoms being the most advanced. By entangling up to 20 qubits, Omran et al. and Song et al.—working with Rydberg atom qubits and superconducting qubits, respectively—demonstrated how far these platforms have reached. The demonstrated controllable generation and detection of entanglement on such quantum systems is promising for the development of large-scale quantum processors.
The list of institutions and researchers involved in mutual effort to entangle 20 qubits is impressive and formidable. Those are shown here:
Generation of multicomponent atomic Schrödinger cat states of up to 20 qubits
Chao Song1,*, Kai Xu2,3,*, Hekang Li2,*, Yu-Ran Zhang2,4, Xu Zhang1, Wuxin Liu1, Qiujiang Guo1, Zhen Wang1, Wenhui Ren1, Jie Hao5, Hui Feng5, Heng Fan2,3,†, Dongning Zheng2,3,†, Da-Wei Wang1,3, H. Wang1,6,†, Shi-Yao Zhu1,6
1. Interdisciplinary Center for Quantum Information, State Key Laboratory of Modern Optical Instrumentation, and Zhejiang Province Key Laboratory of Quantum Technology and Device, Department of Physics, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027, China.
2. Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190, China.
3. CAS Center for Excellence in Topological Quantum Computation, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190, China.
4. Beijing Computational Science Research Center, Beijing 100094, China.
5. Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190, China.
6. Synergetic Innovation Center of Quantum Information and Quantum Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026, China.

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