(Sage.Journals) Technology hype is an important concept in business, marketing, and science and technology studies, but it is rarely related to security studies. This abstract describes a research article using quantum technologies that examines rational and performative perspectives on technology hype as either a kind of exaggeration or expectant discourse.
The author Frank Smith compares and contrasts hype cycles with threat inflation and securitization theory. He proposes that theoretical propositions about technology hype as being common in national security, with variable degrees of acceptance, familiar content, and significant consequences.
This abstract describes a case study on quantum technologies provides proof of concept. The complete article is available for purchase online from SAE.  The author found   ample evidence of hype over quantum computers, communications, and sensors; audience acceptance in the national security community varies with familiarity; and consequential decisions appear to follow. While cyclical expectations suggest the need for caution when citing quantum technologies in support of quantum approaches to international relations, a middle-range theory about technology hype provides useful insight into security practice.

0