(ComputerWorld.HK) Quantum cryptography, also called quantum encryption, applies principles of quantum mechanics to encrypt messages in a way that it is never read by anyone outside of the intended recipient. It takes advantage of quantum’s multiple states, coupled with its “no change theory,” which means it cannot be unknowingly interrupted.
One of the problems with quantum computing will be its ability to break certain types of encryption, particularly the methods used in today’s public key infrastructure (PKI), which underlies practically all of today’s online communications. “I’m certainly scared of what can be the result of quantum computing,” says Michael Morris, CEO at Topcoder, a global network of 1.4 million developers. Topcoder is part of Wipro, a global consulting organization. It’s also working on finding solutions to quantum computing programming challenges. “My fear is that we won’t know that the quantum computer capable of doing this even exists until it’s done,” says Topcoder’s Morris. “My fear is that it happens before we know it’s there.”
This article provides extensive, technical information on how to defend against quantum cryptography. In the conclusion, the University of Texas’s La Cour explained, “People are worried about things that are encrypted today staying secure several decades in the future.” Even if companies upgrade their encryption technology as new algorithms come along and go back and re-encrypt all the old files that they’ve stored, it’s impossible to know where all your old messages have gone.

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