(Axios) IonQ has announced what it’s calling “the world’s most powerful quantum computer.” IonQ reports its new quantum computer system has 32 “perfect” qubits — the basic unit of information in a quantum computer — that the company says gives it an expected quantum volume of more than 4,000,000.
IonQ was co-founded by Chris Monroe, a University of Maryland professor and major figure in the development of quantum computers. In the mid-1990s, he began working on entangling atoms to make more precise atomic clocks, the most accurate timekeeping devices known.
IonQ’s approach to quantum computing builds out of that research. It uses trapped ions in a way that Chapman says reduces the errors that qubits are prone to.

0