(Phys.org) Researchers from Georgia Institute of Technology have discovered diversity can get the job done better in quantum computing just as in real life.
Running the same operation over and over again on the same qubit set may just generate the same incorrect answers that can appear statistically to be the correct answer. The solution, according to researchers at the Georgia institute of Technology, is to repeat the operation on different qubit sets that have different error signatures—and therefore won’t produce the same correlated errors.
“The idea here is to generate a diversity of errors so you are not seeing the same error again and again,” said Moinuddin Qureshi, a professor in Georgia Tech’s School of Electrical and Computer Engineering. “Different qubits tend to have different error signatures. When you combine the results from diverse sets, the right answer appears even though each of them individually did not get the right answer,” said Tannu.
Qureshi compares the EDM technique to team-building techniques promoted by human resource consultants. “If you form a team of experts with identical backgrounds, all of them may have the same blind spot,” he said, adding a human dimension. “If you want to make a team resilient to blind spots, collect a group of people who have different blind spots. As a whole, the team will be guarded against specific blind spots.”

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