(Quantumlab.org) Quantum advantage can survive noise in the machine, according to research by CQT Principal Investigator Marco Tomamichel and his collaborators. The researchers have shown the first known separation in computational power between noisy quantum computers and classical computers that does not rely on assumptions about the classical hardness of the underlying problem.
Marco holds a joint appointment with CQT and the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the National University of Singapore, where he is an Associate Professor.
While a universal practical quantum computer is still many decades, and millions of qubits, away, noisy intermediate-scale quantum computers – otherwise known as NISQ devices – are already here. Noise shows up as errors in the qubits arising from imperfect control and influence of their physical environment on their delicate states.
There is a push to find out where NISQ devices may have a quantum advantage over classical computers. To demonstrate quantum advantage, researchers need to show that a quantum computer can solve a given computational problem much more efficiently than a classical computer could manage.

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